Photography Tutorials

Editing Landscape Photography for Natural Results

Edit your landscape photos in natural way to make them shine like the scene you witnessed.

Get a FREE trial with Squarespace and 10% off - http://bit.ly/SquarespaceFirstMan

Follow First Man Photography for the latest updates:

Instagram - http://bit.ly/InstaFirstMan

My Gear - http://bit.ly/FirstManGear

Get a FREE trial of Adobe Lightroom CC and Photoshop - http://bit.ly/AdobeFirstMan

Landscape Photography Workshops - http://bit.ly/WorkshopsFirstMan

In this lightroom tutorial we go over several images to discuss how to edit your landscape photography images in a natural way. 

 

Sunset Photography - How to do Bracketing Photography

Blog-Cover.jpg

Improve your sunset photography by bracketing exposure.

Sunset photography is a challenging genre within landscape photography. I have talked before about how our own eyes and brain work together to let us see a very large dynamic ranges of light. We see details in shadows and very bright highlights at the same time.

Despite cameras having ever increasing dynamic range they still do not compare to the eye/brain combination. The problem is particularly felt in sunset photography where there is high contrast between the sky, where we often shoot straight at the sun, and the ground which gets darker later in the day with long shadows.

We previously got round this using graduated filters. A more modern technique is bracketing photography. Here we take a number of shots at different exposures and combine them in the computer. This creates a RAW file that contains all the details from the darkest shadows to the brightest highlights. This is exactly the same as HDR photography but we are looking to reproduce a natural sunset photography shot that our eyes perceived, rather than that HDR look.

Bracketing Photography

To capture everything that my eyes see I use bracketing photography. To do this in the camera you first need to be in manual mode. You will need a tripod. Set your ISO to 100, aperture to the f8-f16 range and then balance exposure with the shutter speed so you get an image that captures some small detail in the shadows and does not totally over exposure the sky. Use your Histogram to help you expose for the mid tones.

Turn on bracketing. On a Canon camera it is via the Q menu. When doing sunset photography going two stops either side is often the most effective.

Set the camera to fire using the two second timer to avoid any camera shake. The camera needs to be perfectly still for each of the three shots otherwise Lightroom will not be able to combine the images.

Take your shot and the camera will take three exposures. Check each image to make sure you have one that is exposed for the highlights, one for the mid tones and one for shadows.

Combine your sunset photography in Lightroom using the Photo Merge/HDR command. This combines your images into one large RAW file that allows much greater adjustment than a single shot. Process you sunset photography image and aim for something very similar to what your eyes witnessed to avoid your image looking over processed.

Cheating?

Cheating? For me no. I look to create a final image that is as close to what my eyes perceived as possible. the means whether it is with a physical graduated filter, bracketing or a futuristic camera is irrelevant.

Subscribe to the YouTube channel

How to shoot RAW files on your iPhone

Blog-Cover-1.jpg

iOS 10 will let you shoot raw files on your iPhone with Lightroom mobile. The results are simply amazing.

Most people interested in photography will be aware of RAW files. They are essentially digital negatives. They contain all the data the camera sensor collects in an uncompressed format so no data is lost. This means you have much greater flexibility when editing, giving more accurate and detailed adjustments with things like exposure, white balance and colour tone. Just not possible when dealing with compressed files like jpegs.

Thanks to a recent update in Adobe Lightroom Mobile and to Apple’s iOS 10 you can now shoot DNG RAW files with your iPhone and the results are simply astounding. It's like having a whole new camera.

In the video I will show you how to shoot the images, how you can edit them in either Lightroom mobile or your desktop and then look at a few comparison shots so you can see what can be achieved.

Lightroom Mobile

You need to actually shoot your image using the Lightroom app rather than the iOS 10 native camera app and make sure the DNG RAW setting is selected. Once you do, go ahead and shoot your shot. You then have all the editing functions you normally have using Adobe Lightroom. You can start your edit on the phone and then move over to the computer if you wish.

I am amazed about how effective the iPhone camera now actually is. Pulling detail out of highlights and adjusting exposure that is just not possible with jpegs.

Here you can see an image edited from the native camera app. Details are lost in the highlights and you are limited to how much exposure can be adjusted. Look what happens when the same shot is captured in RAW. The difference is amazing.

[tie_slideshow]

[tie_slide]iphone-raw-2[/tie_slide]

[tie_slide]iphone-raw-3 [/tie_slide]

[/tie_slideshow]

The post processing that can now be done is just much much greater. Like turning an image like this:

iphone-raw-4

Into an images like this:

iphone-raw-5

Adobe Photography Plan with Lightroom Mobile

To get this feature you will need to subscribe to the Adobe Photography plan. That gives you Lightroom, Photoshop and Lightroom mobile and this awesome ability to take your smartphone camera pictures to the next level.

Get Lightroom mobile and the Adobe Photography Plan - Click here

Aviation Photography - Lightroom Photo Edit

Blog-Cover-1.jpg

It’s not everyday a helicopter flies so close to my house, when that happened today aviation photography came to the front and I captured a shot. The image was far from perfect so in this video I take you through my editing process to bring it up to scratch. Get Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop today - https://www.firstmanphotography.com/get/photography-plan

The free trail has currently been replaced for a limited time purchase offer. Please see the Adobe site for details by clicking the link above.

Aviation Photography

I must admit that I am not the biggest fan of aviation photography. I really dislike shots that feature an aircraft surrounded by nothing but blue sky. This is especially the case when the rotor blades of helicopters are frozen in time.

To capture the image of the helicopter today I used my Canon 400mm f5.6L lens. I stuck it out the window, whilst handholding, and took the shot having waited for the chopper to get into a good position where I was happy with the composition.

I much prefer aviation photography when there is a sense of movement in the image. To achieve this I reduced my shutter speed down to 1/50 second. The chopper was hovering so I managed to hold the camera steady enough to capture the image with some lovely movement in the rotor blades. This caused a slight loss in sharpness and the image is far from perfect but in the video I walk you through the steps I took to bring it up to scratch.

In the video I also use the clone stamp tool in Adobe Photoshop to remove an irritating telephone wire that I could not prevent being in my frame.  Watch this Aviation Photography Lightroom photo edit it now to see how I post-processed the image.

Subscribe to the YouTube channel.

Water Drop Photography Edit Session

Water-Drop-Edit-Session.jpg

Post-processing a water drop photography shoot.

In this video I go through the post processing of the images shot in the previous video where I cover how to use the SplashArt 2 water dropper to shoot water drop photography.

https://www.firstmanphotography.com/tutorials/water-drop-photography-splashart-dropper

Post processing or editing is a vital part of the photography process and when it comes to water drop photography things are no different. The process starts when importing the images to a computer. In the video I already had the images on the computer thanks to shooting the session with the camera tethered. This is an extremely useful way of shooting studio photography as it allows you to view the images full screen rather than relying on the cameras own screen. Instantly being able to see all the detail of an image is a clear advantage.

How to do water drop photography - https://www.firstmanphotography.com/tutorials/water-drop-photography

With the images already on the computer it is then a case of assessing the images and discarding the ones that are not useable or simply not to your standard. Adobe Lightroom offers a number of options to rank and rate your images. My workflow involves initially flagging the images I am happy with and then making a second pass to score the images using the star ratings. This quickly highlights which images from a shoot I will editing, speeding up my workflow.

I then enter into the editing process. With water drop photography, using Adobe Lightroom water drop images from the same shoot can be made to look very different. This comes mainly through the powerful colour adjustments that Lightroom offers when working with RAW images.

The video goes through the editing of the water drop photos with my editing techniques and workflow being explained. The workflow is very similar in any photo shoot so can be applied to almost any type of photography.

Get a free trial of Adobe Lightroom - Click here.

SUBSCRIBE to the YouTube channel and follow me on Instagram

Landscape Photography Editing - Fine Art Landscape

fine-art-landscape-editing-video-cover.jpg

How I edit a fine art landscape.

In this video we go through the editing techniques and post-processing to create a fine art landscape using Adobe Lightroom.

To get FREE trial of Adobe Lightroom Click here.

This video has come about thanks to the suggestion of a valued subscriber who asked me to go through the post processing of some images. Happy to oblige I went through the edit of one of my recent shots taken whilst in Glenelg on the West Coast of Scotland. Since we have been on a landscape theme recently I thought some landscape photography editing would be a good place to start.

With the conditions I was faced with on the day, the scene immediately screamed black and white. I went ahead and shot a four minute long exposure, planning to turn the image into a fine art landscape photograph. Long exposure lends itself very well to fine art photography.

The fine art landscape editing is done purely in Adobe Lightroom although the final touch is added using Silver Efex form Google's Nik Collection. This final step does not feature in the video as I will be creating future tutorials covering this.

The image used was shot in raw. We go through all the steps and sliders used in Lightroom to post process the image and complete our fine art landscape edit.

During the post processing we use a software version of the ND grad filter and use this to bring out some detail and drama from the sky. This is a very effective landscape photography editing tool and is starting to render the physical version of this filter useless. See my recent video discussing camera filters.

If you enjoy the video and find it useful please let me know and I will make photography editing videos a regular feature.

Follow me on Instagram - http://instagram.com/adamkarnacz

Subscribe to the YouTube channel - Subscribe Now

How to Edit Water Drop Photos

Waterdrop-Edit.jpg

Take your water drop photographs to the next level.

Welcome to the world of water drop photography. In this video we show you how to edit water drop photos in Adobe Lightroom to improve your images quickly and easily.

Capturing these water drop images in camera is the first stage. View the tutorial here: http://www.firstmanphotography.com/tutorials/water-drop-photography

If you are interested in taking water drop photos or have already caught the bug there is a nice little community going on Instagram at #waterdrop. Follow me now at Instagram - http://instagram.com/adamkarnacz

Water drops are clearly an area of photography that people are loving and there are some great images going up. However there are a few key elements that could improve the images I am seeing. Nice straight lines on your water bath is a must but most other things can be corrected or improved in post production, the issues are:

  • Exposure - Get you exposure up so it’s nice and bright.
  • Contrast - Add more. Boom!
  • Saturation - These images are all about colour!!!!
  • Clarity - This is the key to your image popping off the screen/print

Hopefully this will help you take your images to the next level and I look forward to seeing what you create. Please tag me in your shot on Instagram for me to view them.

Good luck and happy shooting.

Infrared Photography - Part 2 - Editing

edit-infrared-photos.jpg

How to Edit Infrared Photos in Photoshop and Lightroom

In this video tutorial we show you how to edit infrared photos from the raw red image that comes out of the camera.

If you have never seen Infrared Photography before then come and feast your senses. Capturing the light normally invisible to human eyes opens up a world of creative possibilities that would otherwise not exist.

This video tutorial is split into two parts with the first part showing you how to capture the raw infrared image whilst on location. This second part will guide you through the post processing where we bring our plain red image to life.

Watch part one on capturing the image. http://www.firstmanphotography.com/tutorials/infrared-photography-part-1

To shoot infrared photography you do not need a special type of converted camera. The only requirement is a small investment in an infrared filter that will attach to your current lens. These filters remove all the colours of the spectrum apart from the wavelengths at the extreme red end which includes infrared. I recommend the Hoya R72 Infrared Filter and this can be purchased for between £30 and £90 depending on the size of your lens, see the link below. The only drawback with this filter is it lets only a small amount of light through so to properly expose an image it will require a long exposure. Whilst this makes portraits tricky there are still endless possibilities in the realm of landscapes and cityscapes and there are not many photographers out there doing it. Just check Flickr to confirm this.

The characteristics of infrared light differ from that of 'normal' white light we are used to experiencing everyday. For example, green foliage such as grass and trees reflect a large amount of infrared light meaning they will be very bright in your final processed image. This is known as the 'Wood Effect' named after Robert W. Wood who pioneered Infrared photography. It is caused by the transparency of chlorophyll to infrared light allowing the light to pass through into the cells of the plants and be reflected back again. Viewed normally, chlorophyll will reflect all the green light back giving leaves and grass it's green appearance.

Capturing infrared photography in this way requires a long exposure. Please see the long exposure tutorial here:

http://www.firstmanphotography.com/tutorials/long-exposure-photography-tutorial

Hoya Infrared R72 Filter