Landscape Photography Vlogs

Wild Waterfalls and Woodland Whereabouts

Landscape Photography at Aysgarth Falls

We travel to Aysgarth Falls in the Yorkshire Dales to shoot some woodland photography and some long exposure waterfalls in this landscape photography vlog.

Follow First Man Photography for the latest updates:

Autumn and Winter Photography

We are approaching that time of year again where the weather is often not on your side. The British Autumn and Winter bring numerous damp and overcast days that do not obviously lend themselves to capturing great photographs. However there are venues and conditions to suit all circumstances and in today’s video I went in search of images that work beautifully in overcast conditions.

Aysgarth Falls and Robin Hood

I headed up to Aysgarth Falls in the Yorkshire Dales that were made famous in the film Robin Hood Prince of Thieves when Kevin Costner fights Little John with big poles in the river. It is a beautiful location but on my visit today there was absolutely no chance of getting into the river. There has been heavy rainfall recently and the river and waterfalls were raging with huge torrents of water. It did make for some interesting photographs and slo mo footage though.

Waterfall Photography

Waterfalls in the UK are often surrounded by trees. Shooting them with direct sunlight on them can often create harsh contrast lines that spoil the image. Capturing them in overcast conditions is ideal when you have the nice soft diffused light created by the clouds.This also means you can capture great images at any time of the day. No need to be getting up early for sunrise or staying out late for sunset. As you might know I am a huge fan of long exposure photography and it works really well with waterfalls to capture some of the movement in the water.

Woodland Photography

Aysgarth Falls is also surrounded by some beautiful woods. I had not planned to do any woodland shots today but as I was walking past one particular tree, the yellow Autumn leaves really caught my eye. I worked up a composition and captured a shot that I am really quite pleased with. It was far from being ideal woodland photography conditions, but I used a shallow depth of field and some strong contrast to really make the tree stand out.

No Drone......

Finally, I missed the drone today. I am planning to order one this week!

Landscape Photography - Sunset in the Yorkshire Dales

Landscape Photography at Grimwith Reservoir

I visit Grimwith Reservoir in the Yorkshire Dales in this landscape photography vlog. There are panoramas, sunsets and some beautiful golden light.

My gear - https://www.firstmanphotography.com/my-gear

Getting out and taking pictures of beautiful scenes is one of life's great pleasures. You can sit at home and watch a landscape photography tutorial but there is simply no substitute to getting off your backside and heading into the great outdoors. It is always a learning experience. Since creating these vlogs I have been going out more than ever and my recent learnings have been around the anticipation of how the weather and the light will develop as the day progresses. There is obviously a massive element of luck when it comes to the weather but every little observation and bit of experience you gather will add to your overall expertise.

Documenting the journey

It has been an interesting experience documenting my work in this way. The story of my day is all built around the images. Without the photographs there is no vlog (although I will be vlogging some of my other business activities at some point). This adds extra pressure to capture good images with the weekly video deadline ever looming. In the past I would often go out and return home empty handed when the weather did not play ball or my composition was not quite right. Now though, I am simply putting everything out - the good, the bad and the ugly. It has been fascinating seeing the reaction.

People clearly value truth and honesty and I am laying myself bare for all to see. However on several occasions people have loved the images. I simply would not have published previously. Whilst people are often quick to praise, the analytics afforded by social media really helps to back up this feedback. Enjoy the process, create the work, put it out and let people decide what they like. Trust in your talents and do not waste time criticising yourself.

Grimwith Reservoir

Grimwith Reservoir is the largest body of water in the Yorkshire Dales and was extended to it's current size in the early 1980's. It is now a beautiful location and important area for some of the local bird life. It is also a particularly remote and unforgiving landscape and high winds are the norm. On this occasion though the sun was out and made for a very pleasant Spring walk.

My video photography blogs are designed to entertain and document how I go about capturing my work. If it provides photography tips and inspiration along the way then please share it with your friends so more people can benefit from the content. If you enjoyed this photography vlog I would really appreciate it if you subscribed to the channel so you can come along for the journey.

Subscribe to the YouTube Channel

Landscape Photography - Waterfalls and Winter Woes

The world of winter landscape photography

Landscape photography in the winter can be a terrible beast. Many things stand in the way of the perfect shot. Rain, wind, lack of colour, unbearable conditions and limited daylight. Despite this,  some of the most beautiful landscape images can emerge from a winters day. However, being in the right place at the right time to capture a great composition is a massive challenge.

Planning

Planning is the key. It is the key to success generally with landscape photography, but is especially the case in the winter. The destination for your shoot should be planned around the weather. There is little point climbing a mountain in heavy wind and clouds. When you get to the top you will be disappointed and most likely a little uncomfortable.

A freezing winter scene with snow and ice will make a magical postcard scene. Sadly most winter days are not like this, especially in the UK and many other classically beautiful places. They are wet, windy, grey and cold. It makes landscape photography in the winter very tricky and requires some 'out of the box' thinking.

What are my options?

There are two good options. Firstly, you go minimalist and arty. Find a lone tree, a rock in a pool, a pier in the fog. Add some interest with a long exposure and these images can be beautiful and tell a story of the location. The story is vital. Get a feel for the place, try to understand it and translate that story into your image. Truly great landscape photographs are born from this type of process. This story can also be enhanced with a short description of your experience at the time and how you came to capture the image.

Secondly, you find somewhere with more interesting features. Cityscapes work well, or like in the video, somewhere with waterfalls. A good waterfall shot is often taken in woods. An overcast day with nice diffused light will result in a better final image.

Ribblehead Viaduct

Nature then takes the lead, to provide the weather that has been forecast, or pivot and do something completely different. The later presented itself to me on my recent shoot at Ribblehead Viaduct in the Yorkshire Dales. My arrival at Ribblehead Viaduct was during some weather of sunny spells, conditions that often lead to a good sunset. However, seconds after I started walking the weather moved in.

Settling for a moody long exposure landscape shot was an acceptable second place. Still the disappointment remains. Winter landscape photography is hard. It requires dedication and an investment of time where the return is far from guaranteed. Failures will happen often. But on some days, when you put in the work and the stars align, you will be rewarded with a very special shot.

Subscribe to the YouTube channel

Follow me on Instagram

Music

All music in the video by Dan Phillipson - http://www.danphillipson.com