Landscape Photography Vlogs

Breaking the Rule of Thirds to Unify my Seascape Photography…& more

Today I break the rule of thirds, suffer a failure on the moors and get up for some summer sunrise seascape photography. 

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In this video I head to the beaches of North Yorkshire to shoot some seascape photography before heading back to the studio to show the photo editing. It eventually worked out with some long exposure photography and by breaking the rule of thirds. It did not come easy though after spending three days searching for an image. This included heading to Roseberry Topping, hitting the moors without luck and encountering miles of poorly flowering heather without any good light. It was very frustrating. It was also brilliant.

It finally forced me to get up early for a sunrise and the coast seemed to offer the best of the weather. The summer beaches in the UK are very popular so to get a clean landscape, sunrise is where it’s at. I headed to Saltwick Bay near Whitby and was welcomed with a tiny amount of Light creating in the sky creating a small possibility of getting a good images. I was lucky enough to have some interesting green rocks on the shore line. Breaking the rule of thirds allowed me to fill the sky with colour and maximise the interest in the foreground created by the rock.

Next I moved along the coast to Sandsend. A place I know very well. Heading to a familiar location is always a good tactic when things are not going totally to plan. It increases the ability to capture a good image when the pressure to discover a new composition is removed. Revisiting old scenes is a valid tactic and will always provide results that are different from previous visits.

On this occasion I ended up with two to three good pictures and it felt like a good reward for three days of toiling. It provided an opportunity at the end of the video to show the edit in an Adobe Lightroom tutorial type segment. I hope you enjoy. 

Once in a Lifetime Seascape Photography

When I went to do some seascape photography I never ever thought I would witness something so spectacular. These unique moments come along so rarely in landscape photography so when they do, you have to seize the moment. This vlog documents one of my favourite photography moments, possibly ever.

Once in a lifetime photo opportunities come around so rarely. When they do it is important to be ready to capture them. The readiness comes from hard work and dedication; getting out with the camera, week after week, honing your skills and practicing your craft. We can go months without capturing a ‘keeper’ but so many photographers in the past have had their careers take off because of a single image. You never know when that might happen to you.

Finally a note on luck. Lucky is a word that is thrown around freely. Was I lucky to capture that last image? Maybe, but luck does not account for the years of hard work, the years of getting out day after day, the fact I switched to plan B because my original location at Saltwick Bay was completely in cloud. Luck didn’t drive me two hours to the location and luck didn’t set the correct camera settings and capture the composition and image.

I had planned to film a video which essentially would have been a seascape photography tutorial. When the amazing conditions presented themselves though I had to default to just capturing the images. Seascape photography can be very creative with the use of long exposure photography, using leading lines and interesting shapes, using the water in the foreground, capturing whatever colour is available and mixing these things into your composition. I will film the tutorial at some point but I still utilised all these techniques so there are plenty of seascape photography tips on offer in this landscape vlog. 

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My video photography blogs are designed to entertain and document how I go about capturing my work. If it provides landscape photography tips and inspiration along the way then please share it with your friends so more people can benefit from the content. If you enjoyed this photography vlog I would really appreciate it if you subscribed to the channel so you can come along for the journey.

Raise your Landscape Photography Game Using Long Exposure

Discover new creative tools by using long exposure to take you images to the next level. We travel to Whitby in this landscape photography tutorial and vlog.

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In this landscape photography tutorial I travel to Whitby in North Yorkshire to capture and share how I create my long exposure images. 

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If you have never seen long exposure photography before you are in for a treat and capturing these images brings new challenges and creative possibilities. Essentially what is happening is by increasing the exposure time we introduce movement into our image that would normally be frozen and it gives the picture added interest and a look that would not be seen by your own eyes.

This video focuses on capturing long exposure landscapes during the day but the principles are the same no matter how or when you use it..

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You will already understand the exposure triangle so when increasing exposure time we need to balance things by reducing ISO or making our aperture smaller to prevent the image being over exposed. However, in daylight conditions, even with ISO at 100 and an aperture at f/16, your shot could still be over exposed before even one second has passed. To achieve the desired effect we want our exposure to be at least 30 seconds. The only way to do this is to use ND filters. These are filters added to the front of your lens that reduce the amount of light passing through the lens without severely affecting the colour. ND filters are rated by how many stops of light they reduce the exposure by. For example if you attach a 2 stop filter to your lens you will need to increase exposure in your camera by the same 2 stops to obtain a proper exposure.

Neutral Density Filters

Neutral Density filters like the Lee Big Stopper reduce the amount of light entering the lens. In the tutorial we are using a 6 stop filter, a 10 stop filter and a Formatt Hitech 82mm 16 stop ND filter which allows us to get some extremely long exposures of several minutes, even in bright daylight conditions.

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Why do Long Exposure Phototgraphy?

Exposures of this length have a number of uses. It will reduce the roughest waters to a smooth tranquil scene and add lots of movement to even the slowest moving clouds. In city scenes it can also be used to remove people from your images. At night it can be used for star trail shots and create interesting and varied light painting images. 

Shutter Release Cable

In addition to the ND filter you will also need a shutter release cable, unless you have a built in timer, allowing you to lock the shutter open when using the bulb mode. Keeping your camera very still is also essential so a good sturdy tripod is handy. If you don't have a tripod you could also place your camera down on a wall or some raised ground. A bean bag can be used to allow a small amount of adjustment or to keep things level on an uneven surface. When using a DSLR it is worth covering your viewfinder with some gaff tape or a viewfinder cap because light can creep in and ruin your image.

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Once you are armed with this knowledge and the few tools you need; get out and take some pictures. It is an amazing motivation to go and see the world and can really pull you out of the landscape photography dip.

3 Ways to Long Exposure | Landscape Photography

Long exposure photography is the order of the day and I share three of my methods for capturing the shot. I also discuss the merits of landscape photography and storytelling during this sunrise photo shoot.

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Long exposure provides a new way to look at the world. Capturing a relatively long period of time in one photograph. It creates an illusion of movement in the image and creates an ethereal mood that invokes feelings of serenity and wonder. Long Exposure has been the basis of my landscape photography for many many years and it is one of the first techniques I consider when I am visualising my image. I love the extra story telling capacity that a long exposure photograph can portray.

Landscape Photography with a twist

The above is achieved by creating context in the scene. It is the stark contrast between static objects in the frame against the movement of things like water and clouds. This juxtaposition on it’s own can expand the story. The power and speed of a waterfall, the direction of clouds and the wind; can all be deduced from a long exposure photograph. These subtle details all n part of a landscape and affect your attitude and feeling towards.

3 Long Exposure Photography Methods

In the video I detail three ways in which I capture my long exposures. First is simply by utilising dull conditions such as sunrise, sunset or during overcast weather conditions. Setting your aperture at around f16 and ISO at 100 will allow a shutter speed of at least a few seconds without the use of any filters. 

ND Filters

Secondly is about using a long shutter speed during sunset and sunrise. I achieve this through bracketing using a 6 stop ND filter. The maximum shutter speed using this technique will normally be about 30 seconds.

2 Minutes and More

Lastly, I do extreme long exposures. Shutter speeds of 2 minutes or more using stacked ND filters up to 16 stops of total light reduction. These can be technically difficult to shoot because any slight movement can result in a less than sharp image. Noise from the sensor also becomes a problem and some cameras can be worse than others.

An exciting part of landscape photography, long shutter speed images are another tool you have in your arsenal to tell your story. 

Landscape Photography - Early starts and stunning sunrises

A Stunning Birthday Sunrise

An insanely early start on my birthday pays off with some amazing light and a stunning sunrise in this landscape photography vlog.

Getting up early to shoot landscape photography is never easy. Some days though, when you are rewarded with an incredible sunrise, it all becomes worth it. Then comes the hard work of making the the most of the available light.

Sunrise photography can often be harder than capturing a sunset. Shooting sunsets affords the luxury of watching the light develop, providing time to get into the right location and compose a shot. Sunrises on the other hand often develop quickly as the sun comes up. Composing the shot in relative darkness provides it’s own challenges as you have to predict how things will look once they are bathed in sunlight.

Filey, North Yorkshire

In this vlog I get up very early and travel to Filey on the East coast of England. My aim is to capture some beautiful seascape photography that makes the most of the stunning sunrise. Coastal images lend themselves perfectly to sunrise and sunset shots as the sea and water reflect all the colour and increase the impact of your image. I find a nice composition at Filey Brigg. To learn more about composition you can check out some of my best landscape photography tutorials on the channel.

Now that Spring has hit I also wanted to tell that story, using one of the classic signs of Spring, the daffodil. Happily there was a good number of daffodills growing on Filey Brigg so I composed a couple of images to try and make the best of these beautiful flowers.

360 Degree Views

Of course, there are also some 360 degree views, all the way around!

My video photography blogs are designed to entertain and document how I go about capturing my work. If it provides tips and inspiration along the way then please share it with your friends so more people can benefit from the content. If you enjoyed this photography vlog I would really appreciate it if you subscribed to the channel so you can come along for the journey.

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Seascapes, sunsets and isolation - Landscape Photography Vlog

Spurn Point Vlog

I travel to Spurn Point in this landscape photography vlog. An amazing and isolated location that provides some stunning seascape and sunset photography opportunities.

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Remote Landscape Photography

When we are trying to capture our best landscape photography it often means travelling to remote and inaccessible locations. Spurn Point is one such place. It is a thin strip of land out on the East Yorkshire coast of the UK that juts out into the Humber estuary. It is full of military history and is an amazing yet strange place. In part due to its isolation and the weather conditions it must often be faced with. It is also an important wildlife sanctuary run by the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust.

East coast seascape sunsets

It is also one of the very few places on the East coast of the UK where you can capture some decent seascape sunset photography. I headed out with a good weather forecast for golden hour and stopped off on route at the Humber bridge, one of the worlds longest suspension bridges. I had a little composition in mind for the bridge whilst I was still test out the 11mm wide angle prime lens.

Spurn Point is accessed only on foot by a causeway where a road used to stand. It was washed away by the rising sea levels during a storm several years ago. Crossing the causeway adds an element of drama to the day and you risk being cut off by the high tide.

Landscape photography wise my aim was to tell the story of Spurn Point. Capturing some beautiful seascapes and picking up a signature sunset shot at the end of the day with some beautiful colour in the sky was my plan. However proceedings were more difficult than I had anticipated and the feeling of isolation out there in the sea created an unnerving feeling.

In the end it was a successful landscape photography trip and I came away with 2-3 images that I am very happy with.

The First Man Vlog

My video photography blogs are designed to entertain and document how I go about capturing my work. If it provides tips and inspiration along the way then please share it with your friends so more people can benefit from the content. If you enjoyed this photography vlog I would really appreciate it if you subscribed to the channel so you can come along for the journey.

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